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AH-64 Apache helicopter

AH-64 Apache helicopter
AH-64 Apache helicopter AH-64 Apache helicopter AH-64 Apache helicopter AH-64 Apache helicopter
Product Code: WTP1131
Availability: In Stock
Price: $99.00
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Description

Seacraft Gallery presents to you the authentic replica of Apache helicopter with historically correct details. This model is hand carved from solid mahogany by skilled craftsmen and not constructed from kits. After passing through several stages of sanding and priming, multiple coast of clear lacquer are then applied into Apache helicopter model to reflect the true beauty of natural wood and for an overall glossy finish. This model will be a special gift for your loved ones or a timeless display on your office desk.

This model is required a quick and easy assembly within 3 minutes as an enjoyable thing. To ensure a damage-free product straight to your doorstep, pieces of the model as shown in the photo are safely covered with foam and separately packed in a box. 

Dimensions:  31cm L x 13cm D x 13cm H, Rotors 25cm

Features: Realistic wings rotate and wheels turn 

History

As the world's foremost attack helicopter, the AH-64 Apache had been designed to survive in combat situations. It was built with what turned out to be an award-winning design by Hughes Helicopters Inc. The Apache prototype was designated YAH-64 and first flew in 1975. Then Hughes in 1976 was granted a full-blown development contract.

The United States Army preferred the AH-64A Apache (new designation) to the Bell YAH-63. Hughes Helicopter was awarded the pre-production contract. This contract was for two of the Apaches. Then the Army gave the approval for full production in 1982. In 1984 the deliveries began out of the plant in Mesa, Arizona. By this time Hughes Helicopters was part of the McDonnell Douglas Helicopter Systems.

Advanced technologies like the TADS/PNVS were added to bolster the effectiveness of the Apache in supporting the ground operations. The same engines were used in this helicopter as in the Navy's Seahawk (SH-60) and the Army's Black Hawk (UH-60), the T700.

During the 1980s the design was improved by McDonnell Douglas and the AH-64 B had and improved cockpit and upgrades that included a new fire-control system. The funding in 1988 was approved for the multi-stage improvement of the weapon and sensor avionic systems and to add some of the digital systems. But then better technology became available and this program was scratched to make more dramatic alterations.

The Apache, because of it being heavily armed and highly manouverable, became the backbone for ground support, no matter what the weather conditions, for the U.S. Army. Then in 1992 the AH-64D Apache Longbow came on the scene, which was vastly improved upon from the AH-64A. The prototype for the AH-64D Apache Longbow was first flown on the 14th of May in 1992.

Testing was not completed until April 1995 after it had been proven that they AH-64D Apache Longbow had greatly surpassed the AH-64A Apache. In October that year full production was approved for the AH64-D Apache Longbow. Also a contract was approved to upgrade the AH-64 Apaches too. The first of the AH-64D Apache Longbows were delivered March 31, 1997.

It was in August of 1997 when McDonnell Douglas merged with The Boeing Company under the Boeing name. The total cost for the AH-64D Apache program was US$11 billion up to and through 2007. Boeing delivered some 500 of the AH-64D Apaches to various clients across the world by August 2004. This aircraft features the latest in digital communications abilities to enable transferring battle information in real time along with having totally-integrated weapons and avionics. These improvements make this helicopter simpler to maintain, more readily deployed, and even more likely to survive. This helicopter is still in use today in a variety of countries including the United States.

 

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