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Anzac Day & The Gallipoli Campaign

Anzac Day & The Gallipoli Campaign

Australian and New Zealand have, for many years, shared various moments in history. As two neighbours with strong natural relations, the relationship between both countries is hugely impressive. Both nations have helped each other out in various times throughout history, creating a natural, lasting respect. A big reason why that matters so much, though, is the fact that both countries have long protected one another. When one is in trouble, the other so often rises to the occasion to assist.

In April, we’ll be celebrating the 105th anniversary of Anzac Day. This is one of the most important days in the calendar for both nations. This is a day where all Australian and New Zealand residents pay home and respect to those who have fought and perished in wars. In particular, though, the Battle of Gallipoli is an event that is paid great attention to. This will be a landmark anniversary and marks a vital moment in the history of both Australia and New Zealand.

The main reason why this is so important is that it plays out a major moment in wartime history for both nations. The legend of Anzac first began on the 25th April, 1915. It was the beginning of eight months’ worth of fighting on Gallipoli. Despite not bringing any kind of end result in terms of a wartime victory, today it’s a fine example of courage, valour, and determination.

It was a moment in history where Australia showed beyond all reproach their ability to fight, to stay strong, and to protect one another. The qualities of the Anzac spirit – togetherness, courage, toughness, discipline, taking action, standing for justice, and mateship – are all vital parts of the story of both Australia and New Zealand.

This event, then, is a landmark event taking place in 2020.

The Gallipoli Campaign

The event itself, the Gallipoli Campaign, is also known as the Battle of Canakkale. It’s a major part in history, and was a key part of the First World War. It took place on the Gallipoli peninsula, which is now part of modern Turkey. It was a key battle and it seen major powers, such as Britain, France, and Russia, try to weaken the hold of the Ottoman Empire on the region.

The Allies engaged with the Turkish forts and, though the attacks failed, it gave the opportunity for a major amphibious landing. They sought to take Istanbul, then the capital of Constantinople. After around 8 months of fighting, with major casualties on both sides – around 250,000 on each side – the campaign was brought to an end. It’s a major part of the battle of the First World War, and today is held as one of the most important events in modern Turkish history.

This was the beginning of the declaration of the Republic of Turkey and the fight for Turkish independence. The campaign itself, though, was equally important for the development of the national consciousness of both Australia and New Zealand. Today, it’s the single most important commemoration event to take place in the countries.

This led to the development of what is known as the Anzac Spirit; the ability for soldiers to become closer and to work together as one. Australian infantry went on to take part in various parts of the Western Front, and also in the Middle East. Though many lay dead and many great people were lost, it was the beginning of a change in how Australia viewed not only itself, but it’s future, too.

In memory of those no longer with us

This event in particular holds a great sense of reverence in the hearts of many Australians and New Zealanders. It’s a major part of the history of both countries, and in memory of those who were lost many events are held. This year, to mark the 105th anniversary of the Battel of Gallipoli, we’re going to mark some of the most important ships to have been sunk during the battle itself.

Naval warfare is something that was vital to the long-enduring history of the battle. The spirit of the battle, then, was best captured in some of the following ships that were sunk at the Battle of Gallipoli. With so many Allied warships deployed, some of the most important and notable include:

  • The Queen Elizabeth – a major battleship and one of the most important in the entire Allied navy. A vital part of their ability to help fight back and played a key role in the eventual conclusion of the conflict.
  • The Goliath – The Goliath was a major part of the Royal Navy and was sunk on May 13th at Cape Helles. It was destroyed, and on board around 570 men were killed in the aftermath of it being sunk.
  • The Irresistible – This ship was mined and eventually sunk on March 18th. With its sinking, around 150 men were killed as it sunk under the waves.
  • The Majestic – Sunk on May 27th at the Cape Helles conflict, with 49 men in total dying in the end result. The Majestic was a key part of the Pre-dreadnaught battleship era for the Royal Navy.
  • The Triumph – Sunk at Anzac, with 78 men in total killed in the incident. The Triumph was struck by torpedoes and was unable to be saved after the ensuing damage meant that it sunk beneath the waves.
  • The Louis – The Louis was a powerful dreadnaught but was ran aground during a game and was eventually destroyed by shellfire on October 31st.
  • AE2 – An Australian submarine that was attacked and then scuttled on April 29th.

Many more ships, though, took part in the battle as a whole. Now, we use Anzac Day as a way of remembering all of those who lost their lives during this incredible battle. While it might have a strong history as part of Australian and New Zealand warfare, today Anzac Spirit captures better than most the true heart and the strength of togetherness that was displayed during the Battle of Gallipoli. When the 25th comes around, be sure to pay your respects to all those who fought, served, and lost.

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